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VITAL WEEKLY
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number 429
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week 27
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KARRI O - KIDS USED TO DREAM OF BECOMING ASTRONAUTS (CD by Abflug)
LAKE LUSTRE - INDECIPHEREABILIA (CD by Abflug)
BRUNO MOREIGNE - LOCUS NIGER (CD by Kaon)
FALAISE, SAMWORTH, TANGUAY, VAN DER SCHYFF - THE UNEXPECTED ONE (CD by Ambiances Magnétiques)
ROGER REYNOLDS - PROCESS AND PASSION (2CD by Pogus)
MONDOMARC - SAURA (CD by Klangkrieg)
GUIDO MÖBIUS - KLISTEN (CD by Klangkrieg)
WHO WANTS TO BE A MILLIONAIRE (CD compilation by Klangkrieg)
ROB MAZUREK - MUSIC FOR SHATTERED LIGHT BOX AND 7 POSTERS (CD by Bottrop-boy)
MAJA S.K. RATKJE & LASSE MARHAUG - MUSIC FOR LOVING (CD by Bottrop-boy)
GERWALD ROCKENSCHAUB - PRIVATE PLEASURES (CD by Semishigure)
LAURENT PERNICE - HUMUS - MUSIQUES IMMOBILES 5-15 (CD by Monochrome Vision)
THE BEANS - BASSPLAYER (CD by Intr_Version)
AU - MORT AUX VACHES (CD by Staalplaat)
MIBA - THE CORPLATE PROBLEM (CD by Pax recordings)
PATRIK TORSSON - GÄSTHAMMAR (3"CD by Hapna)
YANNICK DAUBY - LA RIVIERE PENCHEE (LP by Alluvial Recordings)
UBIQUE DAEMON/ZYRTAX (split 7" by Anima Mal Nata)
BLOKE - EXPERIMENTS IN AESTHETICS (CDR by +G6PD Recordings)
STUCHKA VKARMANYE - ILOVEMUMMY (CDR by +G6PD Recordings)
87 CENTRAL - LEFTIES (MP3 by Earlabs)
VIOLET RECHORD - ZHOPA (MONOTONY AND REPETITION) (MP3 by Earlabs)
PROPERGOL Y COLARGOL - CHARLY.ROGER (SONGS FOR FUZZYCANDY) (MP3 from Autres Directions)

 

 

KARRI O - KIDS USED TO DREAM OF BECOMING ASTRONAUTS (CD by Abflug)
LAKE LUSTRE - INDECIPHEREABILIA (CD by Abflug)
The three previous releases by Abflug were all CDRs, but they shared the same thing as these new releases on 'real' CDs: they offer a combination of sound and visual stuff. In the case of Karri O's release it's a two-player computer game called Robotit, but it sadly only plays on windows, which I don't have. Who this Karri O is, I don't know. He has five short pieces of mostly minimal techno music, with some dub influences. More Cologne than Berlin, if you catch my drift. Nice, but not really great.
Lake Lustre is British-born Malthese Australian, who is now living in Switzerland. I thought his release was of much more interest than Karri O's. Lake Lustre plays a mixture of downtempo rhythms, sauced with some experimental laptop electronica, dubby beats and female vocals. Especially the latter add a certain commercial, smooth edge to this music, but you know that is not what Lake Lustre is after. A piece like 'Dragonfly Museum' is too abstract to go down easily. The two vocal tracks, out of a total of eight, are the best tracks on the CD and that's why there is also a video for one of these tracks enclosed here. Shot by Karbon in black and white it depicts life in the big city as seen from the air. The film noir that fits the song quite well. (FdW)
Address: http://www.abflugrec.com

BRUNO MOREIGNE - LOCUS NIGER (CD by Kaon)
A CD about historical places, places where the history was made and changed. Bruno Moreigne went to those places and recorded sounds there and worked with the sound material in his studio. Places that may have no meaning to us anymore, like the monument of the victory against Julius Ceasar in 52 BC, but also the Tiet An Man square, Tchernobil and the World Trade Center. Current history, hopefully carved into our memory. All of these places are surrounded by war and death, except maybe the piece dealing with the solar eclipse of 1999. Although the starting point of this CD is a good one, I must say the execution is not always ok. Many of the pieces sound interchangeable, too many similar processes take place and some of the pieces are too long, I think. A kind of uniform sound arises as a total, but they are presented as different pieces. It doesn't add much strength to the release, which is a pity. It starts out austere and strong, but after a while one starts to think that the same trick is repeated. Maybe if things were a bit shorter and were more along the lines of the opening piece or added more spoken word as in 'Tchernobyl', the release would have been really worthwhile. (Fdw)
Address: http://www.kaon.org

FALAISE, SAMWORTH, TANGUAY, VAN DER SCHYFF - THE UNEXPECTED ONE (CD by Ambiances Magnétiques)
Vancouver meets Montréal! Ron Samworth (electric guitar) and Dylan van der Schyff (drums) from Vancouver join forces with Bernard Falaise (electric guitar) and Pierre Tanguay (drums) from Montréal. Ron Samworth and Dylan van der Schyff are leading figures of the Vancouver new music/improv scene with connections to the likes of George Lewis, Louis Sclavis, Vinny Golia, Barry Guy, Evan Parker and involvement in the NOW Orchestra, Hard Rubber Orchestra, François Houle ensembles and many more.
Bernard Falaise and drummer Pierre Tanguay are Montreal composers and improvisers associated with television, theatre, dance, Les Projectionnistes, Dangereux Zhoms, etc.
In a word all four of them are improvisers with great expertise and reputation.
On this first meeting all four members of this quartet - or double duo if you want - demonstrate a similar interest in improv and improv rock. They talk the same language. Subtle and quiet passages on the one hand, intense and noisy and quasi-melodic outbursts at the other. We hear some very nice battles, like between the two guitarists in "Oh My!". In general the interplay between the four is very concentrated and rich. All four take part in the sound explorations, so that one can say it's really a well-balanced groupimprovisation. Together they lay down a wide spectrum of sounds extracted from their instruments through a diversity of extended techniques and attributes (DM).
Address: http://www.actuellecd.com/

ROGER REYNOLDS - PROCESS AND PASSION (2CD by Pogus)
The american composer Roger Reynolds is interested in two things mainly: speech and the spatial aspects of sound. On his new CD 'Progress and Passion' Reynolds continues his reserach concerning the latter.
Three works found there way to this release: 'Kokoro' (1992) for violin, played by Mark Menzies; 'Focus a beam, emptied of thinking, outward...' (1989) for cello, played here by Hugh Livingston; plus 'Process and Passion' (2002) for violin and cello, played by both just mentioned musicians. CD 1 has these three compositions in a stereophonic recording. CD 2 has the same three works, but "on this disc, the same three works have been given distinctive 6-channel spatialization. This sound choreography was then binaurally encoded by Pei Xiang so as to simulate the experience of the multi-channel versions. This version must be listened to with stereo headphones. It is not suitable for speaker playback of radio broadcast".
So on CD one we hear the compositions through a traditional recording of instrumental and acoustic sound. On cd two - the headphone version - we are offered the same works through a binaural encoding. Does this complex sound processing reveal new dimensions is the question to be answered here? Otherwise it makes no sense.
It definetely does. Recording technique is still developping as this release shows. On the binaural recording we move deeper and deeper into the acoustic world. We are offered an amazing audible experience. The difference between both recordings is considerable. The binaural recording reveals 'spaces' - this is the most fitting metaphor - that are not heard on the stereophonic version. In a way the sound is so concrete and tangible that you can alomst grab it. Because of the richness of the recording it's absolutely not disturbing that we deal with works for one or two instruments. Because of this it is possible to experience all the acoustic details that the binaural recording makes audible.
But why this double release? Is it meant as a test? Does the stereophonic recording has it's own unique qualities ...? I don't know. Maybe the answer is somewhere hidden in the extensive liner notes.
But to me, it's not the technical extravaganza that impresses me most. Reynolds combines his love for sound in a broader compositional context. As a composer he does not limit himself to soundaspects only. Together with the great and inspired playing of both musicians it makes my flesh creep. For more then one reason a very good and interesting release (DM).
Address: http://www.pogus.com/

MONDOMARC - SAURA (CD by Klangkrieg)
GUIDO MÖBIUS - KLISTEN (CD by Klangkrieg)
WHO WANTS TO BE A MILLIONAIRE (CD compilation by Klangkrieg)
The man behind Mondomarc is called Marc Domenech Victoria Saura of Zerboni diSposetti, but I think I would wanna be called Mondomarc too with such a lenghty name. Native from Spain but since sixteen years living in Berlin. In 1996, he founded a band Mondo Fumatora, which I never heard and this 'SauRa' is his debut solo album. He is helped out by Gwendolin (of Mondo Fumatora), Sebastian Skalei (of Kat Cosm) and Derick Rhodes (Solarscape). Ladies and gentleman: Mondomarc plays popmusic. No doubt inspired by both electro-pop aswell as hip hop, this modern popmusic. Lots of singing on this one, even some raps, some in English, some in Spanish, and both are hard to understand. Not that it really matters as this record is bursting with energy throughout. Totally fucked up electro and hip hop rhythms, in combination with likewise fucked up guitars and vocals: this is party music for the hard of heart. Great stuff.
The very same thing can be said of 'Klisten' by Guido Möbius. Great stuff. Möbius plays guitar in a band named Hildeguard and has a small record label, Emphase Records. This is also his first solo CD and it comes as a surprise. He plays, beside guitar, bass, glockenspiel, voice, jew harp, banjo, percussion, sampling and moog but they are all thrown into the computer and eight carefully constructed pieces of, well, popmusic. Minimalist changing harmonies, a lot of things happening on a lot of levels, carefully produced, and there is nothing I could compare this with, other than maybe some of Blumm and Sack works (Blumm plays bass on one of these tracks). Psychedelic fuzzy guitars at times, open strumming at other times. A great pleasure to hear such fresh sounds. And at just maybe thirty minutes a bit too short, but that's also a power: a great dish is great because it's just not enough, but more would have been too much maybe.
The compilation 'Who Wants To Be A Millionaire' is about a piece by Guy Mitchelmore found on a CD that came with the Future Music magazine. Guy asks people to send in 'signature theme' for such TV shows as 'Who Wants To Be A Millionaire' and there is the possibility to win prizes. On this compilation it is of course not the idea to win any prizes, but to ridicul the idea of such TV shows or competitions to write signature themes. This kind of stuff is well in the hands of people such as Jayrope, Donna Summer, Transformer Di Roboter or Chorgeschlecht who carefully chop up the spoken word intro, add a dose of samples and breakbeat rhythms and create a total mayhem. Maybe the more unusual suspects create a different thing? Zeitkratzer, who ever thought they would be on such a thing, offer a heavy piece of electronica and acoustic banging. Or Ekkehard Ehlers jazzy but minimal techno (or is minimal but jazzy?) or Vert, who is also not known for his many remixes? They all do a fine job in making this is into a well varied and very effective piece of media deconstruction. Nice work indeed. (FdW)
Address: http://www.klangkrieg-produktionen.de

ROB MAZUREK - MUSIC FOR SHATTERED LIGHT BOX AND 7 POSTERS (CD by Bottrop-boy)
MAJA S.K. RATKJE & LASSE MARHAUG - MUSIC FOR LOVING (CD by Bottrop-boy)
GERWALD ROCKENSCHAUB - PRIVATE PLEASURES (CD by Semishigure)
These two releases on Bottrop-boy are kinda related because of the title 'music for' but also they both dabble with the notions of noise, but in a different way. A while ago, I reviewed Rob Mazurek's 'Sweet & Vicious Like Frankenstein', of which I was only partly positive and my grudge was against some of the noise outings on that CD. So to review another Mazurek CD which seems to be dealing with just noise, may not be an easy task. In forty minutes, Mazurek plays 74 tracks, but of course it's a matter of placing index markers at moments. It sure leaves the possibility to hit your 'random' button and let it spin in a different way; I am not sure if Mazurek thinks this is a great and new idea, because it's not, but I also think he's well aware of that. The noise Mazurek puts on here is of a milder kind. Things don't explode like Merzbow, but a mildly spicey treatments of organ-like sounds. Sometimes a bit louder and sometimes a bit softer and plug-ins or other assorted software works overtime. This music is played at an art-installation of Mazurek and I would be curious to know how soft or loud that music is played. I think it's rather loud for an art-space but maybe it works well, who knows. I don't think Mazurek is a noise man, but rather someone who likes to play around with noise. But being not really a noise man is ok, as this CD was actually quite enjoyable, much to my surprise.
Now Mr. Marhaug he is a noise man. And in the person of Maja Ratkje he found a noise chick. Maja is a member of Spunk and Fe-Mail, and recentely making a CD with Jaap Blonk. Here the two return to their laptops as the source for the noise music. Apart from the usual dose of feedback and treated acoustic objects, there is a wide variety of plundered sounds to be heard, under which I recognized some Steve Reich is 'Sliced Minimalist Meets Sheep and Easy, Cool and Dancing Diva' (titels chosen with some care). There is a great variety in approaches to noise in the seven pieces on this CD. '4-23, A Tribute To Arnold Schönberg In Heavy Syrup' is for instance a slow piece in which acoustic elements work towards a crescendo. 'Let it Be' processes guitar riffs and the title piece is a plunderphonic track in it's purest form. A fine work of good noise made by those who can.
The Semishigure imprint of the Bottrop-boy label offers music that is made by visual artists, or visual music by audio artists. Since I rarely dabble in the world of art, some of these names don't mean much to me, but apperentely Gerwald Rockenschaub is a well-known visual artist. But since he started out in Vienna, he played in bands and was a DJ and released even some records on his own Definitely Something label. But now he lives and works in Berlin and 'Private Pleasures' is his first music work in five years. I think the title is very apt chosen: making this music should have been a private pleasure and maybe not something that should have been shared through a release on a compact disc. I didn't hear his other music, so I can't relate to that, but in the lengthy pieces he fiddles around with a drummachine. Partly techno music, but without any real groove, or idea. Sometimes it seems that he merely hits a button. Compositional strcuture is not there, and also it doesn't qualify for improvisation. I really don't get it this at all. As said, this should have been a pleasure to be kept very private. (FdW)
Address: http://www.bottrop-boy.com

LAURENT PERNICE - HUMUS - MUSIQUES IMMOBILES 5-15 (CD by Monochrome Vision)
Although I don't think much music by Laurent Pernice was reviewed in Vital Weekly, he is one of the busiest people in electronic music in France. His first solo album is from 1989 and after that he played with Nox and after that dabbled around in many different musical styles, such as ambient, techno and like on this new solo release, pure electronic music. In all of his various outings he stumbled upon accidents in the studio, and by these accidents started to move by themselves and loop around. Laurent Pernice calls this 'Musiques Immobiles', but it's certainly music that moves, me thinks. The first piece he did with his new comcept was a doublebass with some high notes and a zither played with bass drumsticks. In a way, Pernice re-invents by new means, the chance music of John Cage. That first creation is not on this CD, as we started with number five onwards. Despite the interesting talk on the cover, much of the immovable musics of Pernice, are sample based ambient musics. Some of these are a bit more gritty of tone like 'Descendre', but the sampled and processed humming of 'Cytryth' is definetely smoothly played ambient music. Not that this is a big problem for me, as I think this is a very nice album of minimal, almost static sounds, that somehow each move in it's own way. There is enough variation throughout these tracks to keep the attention going, although maybe some of the pieces are a bit long. And not being too familiar with his older stuff, I think that's something to search for. (FdW)
Address: http://www.monochromevision.ru

THE BEANS - BASSPLAYER (CD by Intr_Version)
My first encounter with The Beans was on the Saturday Morning Empiress compilation on the same label that now releases the full length by them, Intr_Version. I said I don't know who they are, but that I expected them to be from the circles of Godspeed You Black Emperor. Still, I don't know anything about this band, but it seems to me a fairly traditional line up of guitars, bass, drums, piano, cello. Their sound doesn't resemble Godspeed very much. The Beans play easy going post rock, leaping occassionally into drone related music, but doesn't have the big drama climaxes that Godspeed is so well-known for. Music that passes by without being noted too much, no big bang to interrupt, but rather nicely background music. It seems that I don't like this very much, but that's not true. I do like it a lot. It's very enjoyable, yet maybe not very new sounding music. Good music to work by. (FdW)
Address: http://www.intr-version.com

AU - MORT AUX VACHES (CD by Staalplaat)
Au stands, in Dutch for 'ouch', but it's also the two first letters from Audio - I guess the music of Au is more about the latter than to really hurt. Au, Paul Klaui and Jan Borchers, are from The Hague (but not connected to the famous The Hague electro-scene) and have two CDs out so far (besides a whole bunch of CRs, cassettes and even mini-discs), "Non-Existing Output" (on their own Grond Records label) and "Recycling" (on Locust Media/Met Life). Both of these CDs were a culmination and a full stop to what they did up until that point, and in that respect their live recording for VPRO radio in the 'Mort Aux Vaches' series is no different. Past elements return here, like the bicycle ride used on "Recycling", but now embedded in electronica. New elements for Au, like acoustic sounds and found sound, are used here for the first time, so in that respect 'Mort Aux Vaches' is the breakpoint between old and new. Rather than using computers, Au likes analogue electronica. I once saw them live behind several old synths, a big mixing board and a stack of sound effects. Au partly composes and partly improvise on their equipment. This result in a jazzy track on second track and more improvised musique concrete in the fourth one. Sometimes the improvisations get off the track but throughout they maintain a right course. Another point of objection is that the music is sometimes too normal, too sweet and tension lacks here and there. But throughout it's a very fine disc in a very fine series. (FdW)
Address: http://www.staalplaat.com

MIBA - THE CORPLATE PROBLEM (CD by Pax recordings)
Miba is Mark Bartscher and Kristin Miltner, who present here there some of there electro-acoustic work. They live and work in the Bay Area and participated in several festivals there. On "The Corplate Porblem" they make use of acorns, bells, washers, voice, laptpos and selfcreated software patches. Miba tries to create "rhythmic granular textures ranging from harmonic washes to dense noise". The track opening "Weird Birds" reminded me of another but considerable older american electronic outfit, namely Mother Mallard's Portable Masterpiece Co. But Bartscher and Miltner seem to be more inspired by the music of people like Pauline Oliveros, Maggi Payne and Alvin Curran. But there is a correspondance. One could say they make experimental, sample-based music off a very friendly kind. To put it differently, they keep the balance between experimental sound-explorations on the one hand, and ambient spacy music on the other. Well done (DM)
Address: http://www.paxrecordings.com/

PATRIK TORSSON - GÄSTHAMMAR (3"CD by Hapna)
Following hot on the heels of his full length debut CD 'Kolväteserenader' (see Vital Weekly 423), follows a 3" CD about 'the life of people in small boats' - a release about the summer. As one may know Sweden has a lot of small lakes and it seems that everyone has a boat to cross the water. Much more than on his previous CD, rhythm machines play an important role on this release, on top of which Torsson adds his vocals. The intimacy of the previous CD seems to be gone and maybe some of the Warp acts had some influence on the final result, but now with the inclusion of vocals. Seven short, sketch like tracks that form in execution an uniform whole. It's good that this is a 3"CD and not a full-length, because it would have leaped into boredom, I think. Now they all seem to make sense. Short, sweet and hot. Summertime is coming. (FdW)
Address: http://www.hapna.com

YANNICK DAUBY - LA RIVIERE PENCHEE (LP by Alluvial Recordings)
A small group of people concentrate on bringing drone music finding it's origin in field recordings aswell as close miked recordings of controlled action, like rubbing wooden sticks or leaves. Mnortham, Seth Nehil, JGrzinich, Olivia Block and Yannick Dauby (or Jeph Jerman, Small Cruel Party and Giancarlo Toniutti to mention the older lot among them) are a few of them. Sometimes they work together on collaborative efforts. Yannick Dauby has released various works with Mnortham (as Entrelacs, a 7" on Drone Records) and one 3"CDR for And/Oar with Christophe Havard and several solo works. On this LP he is strictly concerned with field recordings and hand manipulated sounds. Electronic sounds don't seem to be playing a big role on this record, save maybe for some equalization of sounds. Bird calls are being looped and wind chimes recorded out doors. This kind of music is usually dense, hence the fact that it's part of the drone world, but also acoustic sounding, with more open ended sounds. The minimal aspect, almost frozen like a picture, is of course always present in this kind of music. Now I come to think of it, the artwork of this LP (and other releases of this kind of music) contains usually close up of landscape elements and resemble the music quite well. Yannick Dauby succeeded in producing a more than excellent LP, which fit a small but strong tradition. (FdW)
Address: <alluvial@hotmail.com>

UBIQUE DAEMON/ZYRTAX (split 7" by Anima Mal Nata)
A split 7" on a Dutch label of which I never heard, Anima Mal Nata, who have a whole bunch of CDR releases aswell as a series of comic books. In a sort of collaborative effort, two, again unknown bands, work together. The a-side has soundmaterial by Zyrtax and Ubique Daemon and is mixed by the latter. The treatments are lo-fi noise like with some additional distorted guitar, but also without much structure.
The b-side has soundmaterial by Ubique Daemon and Zyrtax (note the reverse order) and is mixed by Zyrtax. After a sort of ambient industrial opening sound, the piece leaps into a semi-industrial rhythm and additional noises. Quite crude in approach and also a bit unstructured. Both of these bands operate in a rather lo-fi experimental approach, which is not really spend on me, I must sadly report. (FdW)
Address: <mherms@home.nl>

BLOKE - EXPERIMENTS IN AESTHETICS (CDR by +G6PD Recordings)
STUCHKA VKARMANYE - ILOVEMUMMY (CDR by +G6PD Recordings)
The label name stand for 'Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase', a mutation of the gene first reported in 1979 and with about 400 million people affected by it. It's also a label with headquarters in Jerusalem and London and with two releases at hand. The first is by Bloke, aka Yaniv Navot, who released a 12" on Digital Kranky sometime ago (see also Vital Weekly 354). There are a couple of other releases, which I don't know and he's playing live in Israel and works on sounds for PC games. 'Experiments In Aesthetics' is his first full length release and is stylistically a continuation from his 12" on Digital Kranky, but maybe a bit strict on the techno element here. He plays highly energetic techno music in the best tradition of early Aphex Twin. Bloke uses so much energy that some fatigue struck me after the eighth track and then there were still four to go, but this quirky uptempo music made a good impression.
It is not said who Stuchka Vkarmanye is, nor where he or she is from. The label claims not to know. Oh well, heard that before. No big deal, let's go the music right away. Just like Bloke, Vkarmanye plays techno music, but albeit of a more rudimentary character. His six pieces are more raw and crude and less worked out. But definetely music that would go down well at some illegal tekno rave. Great uptempo bit rotten music. (FdW)
Address: http://www.g6pd.corky.net

87 CENTRAL - LEFTIES (MP3 by Earlabs)
VIOLET RECHORD - ZHOPA (MONOTONY AND REPETITION) (MP3 by Earlabs)
For many reasons I love the Earlabs releases on their two net labels. One is about historical works, where one can find classical recordings from both the serious world of academic music and classics from the world of industrial music and one label is about new music. 87 Central may need no introduction for he has some excellent releases by JdK and Staalplaat and dabbles since a long time in the world of field recordings and online labels. Two lenghty tracks here. 'Flat' bounces around with electronics, processed sounds of bees and vaguely rumble in kitchen. Quite a dark atmosphere hoovering about. 'Standard Deviation' is about twice as long and probably twice as minimal. Here 87 Central processes feedback, another long love of his, in a likewise dark atmospheric piece.
The second new release by Earlabs is Violet Rechord, the collaborative effort of Jeff Surak (aka Violet) and Andreas Tilliander (aka Rechord). In case you don't know, 'Zhopa' means asshole in Russian, but also 'nowhere' as in 'living in the middle of nowhere' and it's more about the second meaning than the first. For their joint effort, Tilliander send raw sound material to Surak and the latter transformed them into six pieces of indeed minimalistic music. As Rechord, Tilliander is more the ambient than techno guy and that is shown in this music. Transformed and distorted ambient drones with occassional dashes of rhythm, such as in 'Bipolar Aspects Of The Daily Grind'. Yet I must say that these tracks were ok, but not really great. I am not sure wether this has to do with the original material or with the final result, but I have a feeling a little bit more could have been done, like they are not finished or may need alternative treatments. (FdW)
Address: http://www.earlabs.org

PROPERGOL Y COLARGOL - CHARLY.ROGER (SONGS FOR FUZZYCANDY) (MP3 from Autres Directions)
Two musicians from France, these Propergol Y Colargol, who play atmospheric music and cite Stylus, Sonic Boom and Organisation (Kraftwerk's first guise) as their influence. The atmospheric music is made by various keyboards connected to a computer and each of the eleven tracks cycle around one theme and over that theme some other sounds are added, but each is a specific theme. Occassionally I though to hear guitar-like sounds, but it might very well be sampled. In most of the pieces the melancholical card is played, with keys in minor and a darker mood is never far away. Technoid rhythms are also sometimes used, which add a more modern feel to this somewhat cosmic music. Overall, I thought this was a pleasent, rich tapestry of sound, which enjoyed me throughout. (FdW)
Address: http://www.autresdirections.net/inmusic